Re: [World] The truth about electricity


From "G Fahrlender" <addressis@removed>
Date Wed, 6 Aug 2003 08:19:16 -0500

The higher voltages are the basis for the arc lighting that is used on
buildings and poles.  It requires a high voltage to get it to work.  The
same is true for the neon and argon signs.  The "jacob's ladder" seen in old
horror movies and science fiction movies used two separated wires (contacts)
that arced and the sparks would ride up the two wires being closer together
at the bottom and farther apart at the top which would cause the arc to
stop.  The unit uses a 20,000 volt neon transformer to accomplish the feat.
When I was in high school, a kid built one as a science project.  It
requires very high voltages, not amps to get the electricity to arc between
the contacts. I remember it was a pretty cool demonstration.
 At low voltages, normally, contact is needed to start an arc.  This is the
whole idea in doing arc welding.  You have to scratch (make contact) with
the metal surface with the welding rod and then make an arc.  If you lift
the rod too high from the metal surface, the arc ends and you have to start
over again. This is done at voltages of 220 and under, ac and dc.

George C. Fahrlender
geofahr@copper.net
On Location Services
P O Box 8073
Levelland,, TX
ON-LOCATION SERVICES
"Quality, You Can See"
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Don" <windowcleaner1@mindspring.com>
To: <World@wcmail.net>
Sent: Tuesday, August 05, 2003 9:24 PM
Subject: Re: [World] The truth about electricity


> I have been following this thread with some interest.  My brother is a
> master electrician and I talked to him about it
> That is basically what he said.  In a single family dwelling electricity
> doesn't arc more then a couple of inches.....but as you start getting more
> volts you get much bigger arcs.
>
> Don Chute
> Marietta, GA
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Gary Mauer" <moms@wcmail.net>
> To: <World@wcmail.net>
> Sent: Tuesday, August 05, 2003 8:44 PM
> Subject: RE: [World] The truth about electricity
>
>
> > Just so you know - I'm done after this message.
> >
> > I've already backed off to where I'm not as concerned about working
> distance from the 120
> > 0r 240 volts you encounter in single family homes.
> > But condominiums are residential, and route work often involves
> multi-tenant buildings.
> > That means more power than you would encounter in a single family home.
> > Sometimes the power lines running down the street are very close to a
> house.  There's a
> > lot of power in those lines. Thousands of volts.
> >
> > No, an arc won't jump out and get you just because you happen to be
there.
> I've already
> > retreated to where I'm talking about arcing after someone has made
contact
> somehow. .Yes
> > you need to be "more" concerned about making contact than about causing
an
> arc.
> >
> > That doesn't mean arcing doesn't kill or injure people.
> >
> > I've been doing some browsing. If you want to see some warnings about
how
> arcing can cause
> > burns or knock you around even if you're not part of the arc itself,
check
> out this
> > electrician's link.........
> > http://ecmweb.com/ar/electric_working_hot_avoid/index.htm
> >
> > Like I said, I've entered the power company's phone number into my cell
> phone, so I can
> > call them if I have a question.
> >
> > And that's all I've got to say, even if I think of something else - and
> even if anyone
> > wants to disagree.
> >
> > Gary Mauer
> > Window Cleaning Network
> > Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, USA
> > www.window-cleaning.net
> >
> >
> > Window Cleaning Network and WCmail sponsored by:
> >
> > American Window Cleaner Magazine
> > "The Voice of the Professional Window Cleaner"
> > www.AWCmag.com
> >
>
>
>
> Window Cleaning Network and WCmail sponsored by:
>
> American Window Cleaner Magazine
> "The Voice of the Professional Window Cleaner"
> www.AWCmag.com
>


Window Cleaning Network and WCmail sponsored by:

American Window Cleaner Magazine
"The Voice of the Professional Window Cleaner"
www.AWCmag.com


More Messages: